EVENTS

A VIRTUAL ZOOM PUPPET SHOW WITH MARGARET MOODY PUPPETS
Live via Zoom SUN, SEP 13, 2020 at 2pm

As part of the Mill’s reopening weekend, we are pleased to present a free, live, virtual puppet show for children via Zoom,  presented by Margaret Moody Puppets of Arlington. The program, hosted by Edward Gordon, Director of Museum Programs, will be held on Sunday, September 13, live at 2 pm.

“The Badger Meets the Fairies” tells the tale of gentle Mr. Badger, who is thrilled to meet Blossom, a flower fairy, in the garden. He flies away with her to help the fairies build a playground. But then it’s complicated: the fairies won’t use cement; and Mr. Badger wants to learn to fly.

Accompanied by musical arrangements by Peter Lehman and Ann Wynne, this program is geared toward preschoolers to age 8; children will be treated to this imaginative story as well as a live segment on how to make your own puppet at home. The main puppet show will last approximately 30 minutes, with supplementary content.

Preregistration is not required; here is the link to join the show.
Meeting ID: 899 7252 9386 Passcode: 966075.

The online program is free; if you would like to make a donation to the Old Schwamb Mill, visit https://bit.ly/2FMMf6j. For more information, call (781) 643-0554 on Saturday, September 12.

CURRENT EXHIBIT: SHE DID IT — WOMEN SAVING HISTORY

TUE AND SAT 10am to 4 pm

In 2020, the Old Schwamb Mill celebrates 50 years of preservation at the historic mill that was saved from demolition in 1970. A new exhibition titled She Did It: Women Saving History honors Patricia C. Fitzmaurice, a foresighted community leader and historic preservation advocate, who rallied friends and funds to purchase and save the 19th century mill.

Her dream was to convert the oval picture frame factory into a living history museum, where frames are still made today using original tools and traditional woodworking practices. She envisioned a community art center as a place where working artists could rent studios and art and craft classes would be offered for all ages.

Pat did it all. She networked with friends and fellow Arlington residents to raise funds establishing the Schwamb Mill Preservation Trust; she reached out to artists and others to rent space in the mill to help pay the mortgage and utility bills; she gave guided tours and even learned how to make oval wooden frames herself, so she could give demonstrations on the historic machines she had saved. 

The Old Schwamb Mill sponsors a wide variety of programs and events for both adults and children, including Music at the Mill performances, arts and crafts for kids, open houses, lecture, and much more.